Apple ne vend plus de produits…

Pour tous ceux qui pensent encore qu’Apple vend des produits (iPhone 6) et ne comprennent pas leur approche "Ecosystème"…

Une très bonne analyse qui nous change des discussions sur la nouvelle "taille de l’écran"

Apple ne vend plus de produits

Pour chaque euro généré par la vente d’un iPhone, combien d’euros sont générés par les musiciens, développeurs, fabricants d’accessoires ou acteurs industriels ? Car même si Apple ne se rémunère que peu sur ce chiffre global (ce n’est pas leur objectif direct), le stabilité générée autour de chacun de leurs produits est proprement phénoménale. Chaque produit Apple est une comète avec une queue de plusieurs km de long, qui donne une assise incomparable sur le marché. Une assise qui stabilise Apple bien au-delà ce qu’un Microsoft ou un Samsung pourrait rêver avoir un jour.

Innoveo joins Pactera!

As some of you already know, we have joined the US/Chinese PacteraGroup since January 1, 2014. Innoveo Solutions will be renamed in Pactera Switzerland, our software product name remains "Innoveo Skye". The whole team remains in Zurich, Switzerland and will be empowered in the coming time. We are very happy to be able to join these 20’000 people company and to profit from Pactera’s Sales und big customers’ base! Our next coming months will be very exciting, also by entering the Asia Pacific markets. Also a very solid constellation for our existing customers.

Comme certains le savent déjà, nous avons décidé de rejoindre le Groupe sino-américain Pactera au 1er janvier 2014. Innoveo Solutions sera renommé Pactera Switzerland, le nom du logiciel reste "Innoveo Skye". Le team reste à Zürich et sera augmenté dans les prochains temps. Nous sommes très heureux de pouvoir nous joindre à ce groupe de plus de 20’000 employés et de profiter de la puissance de vente et des clients existants de Pactera! Les prochains mois s’annoncent plus qu’existants, tout comme les premières acquisitions en Asie. Cette constellation est aussi très intéressante pour nos clients existants.

Press Release English:
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pactera-establishes-switzerland-office-and-extends-insurance-industry-solutions-through-key-acquisition-241795041.html

Press Release en français:
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/acquisition-de-la-societe-de-logiciels-dassurance-innoveo-solutions-par-pactera-technology-international-242694801.html

Happy New Year 2014!

I like this image (not just because it is in Saint Barth) mixing rain / bad weather (2nd half of 2013), rainbow (the last weeks) and the good weather which is coming now (2014!).

A BIG THANK to all of you for your much appreciated support during the last months and weeks.

Let’s say bye bye to 2013, and let’s warmly welcome this New Year 2014. Wishing all a Happy New Year, one that is filled with health, happiness and joy!

4th time at LeWeb…

…just realized that it is my 4th time at LeWeb conference (2005, 2006, 2007, 2011).

Funny to have a look back at “Les Blogs 2.0” (yes it was called in this way in 2005) with some “known faces” ;-) And … 350 participants!

Loic LeMeur!

IMG_0597

Anina, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble

IMG_0592

Jeff Clavier, Rodrigo Sepulveda, Dave Siffry, David Hornik

IMG_0602

Souvenir, souvenir :-)

On my way to LeWeb11 conference in Paris

So, it’s time this year to go again to the biggest European Internet conference, LeWeb’11, in Paris with Laurent. 3’268 participants are now registered for the conference, wow.

Topics this years around: SOLOMO, Social-Local-Mobile

Some of the interesting speakers:

  • Mike McCue (CEO Flipboard)
  • Eric Schmidt (Executive Chairman Google)
  • Joanna Shields (VP & Marketing Director EMEA Facebook)
  • Axel Dauchez (CEO Deezer)
  • Kevin Systrom (CEO Instagram)
  • Allen Blue (Co-Founder & Vice President of Product Management LinkedIn)
  • Dennis Crowley (Co-Founder & CEO Foursquare) with Scoble
  • George Whitesides (CEO Virgin Galactic)
  • Money Panel moderated by Jonathan Goodwin, CEO & Partner J Goodwin & Co LLP, with:
    • Jeff Clavier, Founder & Managing Partner, SoftTech VC
    • Harry Nelis, Partner, Accel Partners
    • Danny Rimer, Partner, Index Ventures
    • Eric Archambeau, General Partner, Wellington Partners
  • Phil Libin (CEO Evernote)
  • Marissa Mayer (VP Product Management Google)
  • George Colony (Chairman & CEO, Forrester Research)
  • Panel “How is Social Local Mobile changing enterprise” moderated by: Paul Papadimitriou, VP & Analyst, Constellation Research, with:
    • Nigel Beck, Vice President, Business Development and M&A Social Software, IBM
    • Auren Hoffman, CEO, Rapleaf
    • JP Rangaswami, Chief Scientist, Salesforce.com
  • Plus: Om Malik, Niklas Zennstrom, etc.

And the LeWeb’11 Official Party by Deezer on Thursday evening at … Le Carrousel du Louvre! Outch :-)

So, I’m quite sure, we will a quite intensive time!

Dropbox in Forbes

via Forbes.com

As a happy customer (50GB plan) of Dropbox since years now, I was very interested by this article in Forbes. Some insights (even if I encourage you to read the full article):

  • Dropbox has today 50 million users, one new user per second joining
  • 96% of the users pay nothing
  • 325 million files saved per day
  • Steve Jobs/Apple wanted to acquire Dropbox in 2009 for a nine-digit price
  • 2008: 9 employees. 200k customers
  • 2010: 14 employees, 2 million customers
  • Revenue 2011: $240 million, already profitable, 70 employees
  • Revenue 2012: even if they would not sign one single new customer, their sales will double
  • Dropbox started with $15k from Y Combinator
  • 1st VC round from Sequoia of $1.2 million
  • VC round in 2008, $7.2 million raised
  • VC round in August 2011, $250 million raised with a valuation of around $4 billion, VCs participating: Index Ventures (lead), Sequoia, Greylock, Benchmark, Accel, Goldman Sachs and RIT Capital Partners
  • Competitors perceived: Apple iCloud, Google Drive

Impressive story, wow…

Canon vs. Nikon

via Mashable

No no, I’m not entering the religion fight between the Canon and Nikon fans ;-) As you may know, I’m a happy Canon user for years now, and with the time, you get used to the interface of Canon or Nikon cameras and, if you have some good expensive lenses, you are so or so stuck with one or the other.

There are for sure some detailed differences between both brands, but generally speaking, both have very happy users since years…

What I haven’t realized, on the other hand, is the difference of size between both companies. Actually, Canon is much bigger than Nikon and is selling 4x more DSLR than Nikon! That was not clear for me, always had the impression that both are more or less of equal size…

  Nikon Canon
Founded in 1910 1937
Number of employees ~ 26’000 ~ 197’000
Revenues on cameras
2008
2010
4.8 bn EUR
4.8 bn EUR
12.1 bn EUR
11.5 bn EUR
Revenues on DSLR
2008
2010
2.1 bn EUR
1.9 bn EUR
7.9 bn EUR
8.1 bn EUR

Mobile Trends 2011

via ReadWriteMobile

ReadWriteMobile is publishing an interesting post about the coming and emerging 10 Mobile Trends for 2011 based on a Forrester Research study. Some of them seem to be relevant also for us at Innoveo:

2) 2011 is the Year of the “Dumb” Smartphone User

Smartphones will become more affordable, thanks to handset subsidies. And these new users will be less engaged and active than smartphone early adopters. Forrester expects they’ll download fewer apps on average, but will consume more mobile media thanks to consumer education and convenience provided by the phones.

Despite the fact that these former “dumb phone” users may download fewer apps than early adopters, the overall app forecast is still good. In fact, Gartner also just released a report that stated mobile app store revenue will pass $15 billion in 2011.

3) The Mobile Fragmentation Problem will Continue

Forrester says it expects fragmentation to continue, but it’s not just referring to the multiple variations of a single OS. It means that some customers have smartphones, some have feature phones, some use apps, some use SMS, plus there are multiple OS’s in existence, in multiple versions, with multiple screen sizes and there are a higher number of devices out there. In short: fragmentation. The costs of porting, maintaining and promoting apps will remain high.

4) The “Apps vs. Internet” Debate Will Continue…to be Irrelevant

Says Forrester, it’s not a question of “either/or” when it comes to a choice between apps vs. the mobile Web, but both. Frequent and intense users of services like banking and brokerage will want curated experiences in the form of apps, but the Internet will remain the fallback for more occasional information and needs.

8) Companies will Invest First in Convenient Services for Consumers

Forrester says that mobile product and service professionals, particularly in the travel industry, will invest first to keep their most lucrative customers happy. And in the hierarchy of benefits that mobile offers – revenue generation, cost savings and convenience – convenience will reign during 2011.

10) “Mobile” Will Mean More than Mobile Phones

Consumer adoption of tablets, eReaders, portable media devices and other mobile products has grown in 2010 and this will continue in 2011. Apps and services will need to work across devices and consumers will want ubiquitous access to content and services.  This will force service providers to sync content via the cloud to maintain a consistent experience across platforms.

cross-posted on the Innoveo Blog

Seth Godin –The business of Software

via Seth Godin

If you are reading this post, you may know how far I like all the super valuable inputs of Seth Godin. Really inspiring! So, when Seth was publishing a post about the business of software, I was super excited.

First I have learnt that Seth’s first job was to lead a team that created 5 games for …. the Commodore64!!

Some, to my point of view, very interesting abstracts from his post. Although I *really* encourage you to read the whole post (even a bit long, really great!):

[…] Clearly, just writing a piece of software no longer makes it a business.
So if it’s not about avoiding fatal bugs, what’s the business of software?

At its heart, you need to imagine (and then execute) a business that just happens to involve a piece of software, because it’s become clear that software alone isn’t the point. There isn’t a supply issue–it’s about demand. The business of software is now marketing (which includes design). […]

COMMUNICATE TO USERS: As we’ve seen in just about every industry, marketing involves effectively communicating a story about benefits to (and among) the people who will appreciate them. For software entrepreneurs, this means identifying a group of people who need the utility of what you can offer them and who are willing to give you permission to educate them about why they should buy. Without either element, the software is dead. […]

I think niche opportunities for software are largely unexploited. […]

So, the questions I’d ask:

  • Who can I reach?
  • Is the product so remarkable that they will talk about my product with their peers?
  • Can I earn and maintain permission to continue the conversation?
  • Once they learn about the utility offered, will they pay for it? [...]

ENABLE COMMUNICATION BETWEEN USERS: This is the holy grail of software. […] The network effect is the increased utility of a device that enables communication. […] If you can improve productivity or satisfaction by connecting people, then people will selfishly help you do your marketing.

When building a software business that uses the network effect, I’d ask:

  • Does the connection this enables create demonstrable value?
  • Is there an easy and obvious way for someone who benefits to recruit someone else to join in?
  • Is it open enough to be easy to use but closed enough to avoid becoming a zero-cost commodity? […]

LAST THING: Paying for it. In a competitive market where the marginal cost of an item is zero, the price will move to and eventually reach zero. […] The goal, then, is to create a dynamic where the market isn’t competitive. […] The other condition that’s necessary, though, is that users have to believe that payment is an option. The web has trained the vast majority that interactions online should be free. That makes the act of selling software, particularly to people who haven’t used it yet, really difficult. There are two ways around this:

  1. Free samples. Many software companies (37signals being an obvious one) have discovered the drug dealer model, in which the software is free for a month, connections are built, utility is created and then it begins to cost money.
  2. Move to a platform where commerce is expected. […] The app store for the iPad is like that. The expectation is that this software is going to cost money. It’s far easier to sell a serious app for the iPad than it is on the web, because the platform is organized around commerce.

[…] I wanted to help you realize that just because you can code something that doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. The issues of permission, of networks, of scarcity and of the desire to pay are inherent in the business part of the business of software. […]

Wow, really really impressive analysis!